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2,990 notes

mintywolf:

There are about a billion arrangements of “Bad Apple!!” but this one, performed with traditional Japanese instruments, is one of the best and most unique that I’ve seen. 

It’s the complete opposite of the bouncy techno remixes (which, don’t get me wrong, I enjoy) that make up a lot of Touhou Project fan music, and actually feels a lot truer to the nature of Gensokyo.

(via airinn)

84,548 notes

peachberrylove:

kill-dorothy:

I think this video might interest you guys.

4 days ago, Olivia Olson confirmed that Marceline and Bonnibel have dated before. The reason it has been confirmed is because the new Adventure Time book coming out soon may have details on their relationship, and their relationship obviously can’t be aired on TV because some states of America (and countries in the world) are against same-sex marriage and relationships. 

But yeah, they have indeed dated before.

Can we also talk about official Bubbline art drawn by Natasha Allgeri, former character designer and story board artist for Adventure Time, and now Showrunner of Bee and Puppy Cat!?

*internal screaming*

(Source: lil-human-cal, via bbanditt)

93 notes

sazienas:

I told my friend that I’ll do the Ice Bucket Challenge but I’m still recovering from a cold that’s why it’s turn out to be like this ^ ^”( thanks Elise for your little help  )And I’ll donate to Prasat Neurological Institute (Thailand)

sazienas:

I told my friend that I’ll do the Ice Bucket Challenge but I’m still recovering from a cold that’s why it’s turn out to be like this ^ ^”
( thanks Elise for your little help  )
And I’ll donate to Prasat Neurological Institute (Thailand)

1,105 notes

rhamphotheca:

Japan’s cherry blossom stone is a natural wonder
Meet the cherry blossom stone from Japan - one of the most striking natural rock formations in the world.
by Bec Crew
So-called because when you crack them open, their internal cross-sections look like tiny golden-pink flowers, cherry blossom stones (sakura ishi in Japanese) get their beautiful patterns from mica, which is a commonly found silicate mineral known for its shiny, light-reflecting surface. 
These flower patterns weren’t always made of mica. They started their existence as a complex matrix of six prism-shaped crystal deposits of a magnesium-iron-aluminium composite called cordierite, radiating out from a single dumbbell-shaped crystal made from a magnesium-aluminium-silicate composite called indialite in the centre. 
Hosted inside a fine-grained type of rock called a hornfels - formed underground around 100 million years ago by the intense heat of molten lava - cherry blossom stones underwent a second significant metamorphosis in their geological lifespan when they were exposed to a type of hot water called hydrothermal fluids…
(read more: ScienceAlert! - Australia/NZ)
images: John Rakovan et al.

rhamphotheca:

Japan’s cherry blossom stone is a natural wonder

Meet the cherry blossom stone from Japan - one of the most striking natural rock formations in the world.

by Bec Crew

So-called because when you crack them open, their internal cross-sections look like tiny golden-pink flowers, cherry blossom stones (sakura ishi in Japanese) get their beautiful patterns from mica, which is a commonly found silicate mineral known for its shiny, light-reflecting surface. 

These flower patterns weren’t always made of mica. They started their existence as a complex matrix of six prism-shaped crystal deposits of a magnesium-iron-aluminium composite called cordierite, radiating out from a single dumbbell-shaped crystal made from a magnesium-aluminium-silicate composite called indialite in the centre. 

Hosted inside a fine-grained type of rock called a hornfels - formed underground around 100 million years ago by the intense heat of molten lava - cherry blossom stones underwent a second significant metamorphosis in their geological lifespan when they were exposed to a type of hot water called hydrothermal fluids

(read more: ScienceAlert! - Australia/NZ)

images: John Rakovan et al.

(via kastiakbc)